Where bottom-heavy women fit stuff

Pear Flair

Pear Flair

Where bottom-heavy women fit stuff

Recent Posts

The dreaded ‘Dress Code’

The dreaded ‘Dress Code’

Confession time: I did another order from Everything5Pounds. I have mixed feelings, and this is why. I has been trying to resist fast fashion. Having said that, some of the items from E5P are excellent quality. The other reason for internal disquiet is that the […]

Is it really a bargain?

Is it really a bargain?

Fast fashion. Once upon a time, the “skint” reason made sense. If my work shoes broke and there was only enough money for bills and a spare £12, I couldn’t go out and buy patent leather brogues. Buy I could by something for £9 that […]

Do I dare to try Project333?

Do I dare to try Project333?

As with my quest to only buy recyclable, cruelty-free cosmetics, the new year has made me think of other changes. Nothing swift, just those slow-burn changes that make an impact over time. One such change that has been bouncing around overactive mind is Project333.
 
This is about having a “capsule wardrobe”. You only have 33 items in your wardrobe collection at a time, and change them every three months. There are some sensible exclusions, such as PJs and undies, but the bulk of what the world sees you in is various combinations of the same 33 pieces. Not only does this project help you to de-clutter, it is also meant to inspire your creativity since you have to make the most of what you have.
 
I’ve decided to give it a go, in a diluted version. Firstly, as it’s based on dressing seasonally and winter started last month, I’ll be doing it for less than 3 months before deciding whether to continue. I’m also including accessories in my exclusion list, at least during my two-and-a-bit-month trial. I really ought to include jewellery, since I have an excessive quantity of it, and the same goes for scarves and wraps. But I’d rather try a wimpy version that works than do the “pure” version and give up within a week. I can always try including it in spring or summer. #Partial333 instead of #Project333 J
 
The 33 items I’ve decided to have for the rest of winter are:
  • 10 tops
  • 7 pairs of jeans/trousers (1x light blue jeans, 2x dark blue jeans, 2x work trousers, 1x black jeans, 1x grey jeans)
  • 7 dresses
  • 6 jackets/cardigans
  • 3 coats
 This will give me 77 basic combinations (10 tops multiplied by 7 bottoms equals 56, plus 7 dresses). Add various combinations of accessories and shoes and there are far more outfits then there are days in 3 months. Maybe this isn’t as scary as I thought?
 
Follow me on Instagram so see my daily combinations as I take on Project333 – with curiosity and a little apprehension…
Not resolutions, just good ideas

Not resolutions, just good ideas

Happy New Year, and all that. You had a good Chrissy? A nice break from work (for some)? Laughed, drank, got fat? Good job. Have you set any new year’s resolutions? Ugh. No. No I have not. You know why? Because I’m really not that […]

Beautifying a Business Bod – How to accessorize a suit

Beautifying a Business Bod – How to accessorize a suit

I adore the crisp lines of a good suit. Executives, military, flight attendants; there are plenty of suited and booted looks that can draw you in. No doubt someone has done a study about why some work wear is just so appealing, but for me […]

Adding some international flavour

Adding some international flavour

Have you ever looked at a national or cultural outfit and wanted to borrow parts for yourself? Not that you want to encourage commercial cultural appropriation, but something caught you eye. The colour, the lines, the pattern, the fabric – something made you feel good and you wanted to be able to feel it again.
 
It’s easy to take inspiration from something without thinking about or acknowledging the history that may be behind it. Fashion choices such as ladies arm bands or dreadlocks have caused tension, not just in fashion circles but also in society in general. Certainly in the blogosphere!
 
 
Here are some tips for taking inspiration without giving offence:
 
  1. Know what the item/choice actually is and why you like it.
  2. Find out a little about its use in its country of origin.
  3. Work out what element of its significance inspires you so you can share that knowledge and positivity with others and acknowledge the significance.
  4. Honour and respect it.

For example, here is me in a kurti.
 
Why do I like kurtis? Well, I didn’t always. Before I tried wearing one I thought they looked like nightshirts, which I’m not fond of because they feel restrictive. But then I visited family in India. They all were wearing them as standard day-to-day attire and gave me some as a gift. As soon as I started wearing them, I loved them! The giant slits up the side mean they aren’t restrictive, they are as light and comfy as a t-shirt, but they don’t ride up at the back, and they always have a pocket. Plus, they colour and pattern choices are endless! But I particularly liked the plain tones on myself. I felt like I was wearing it as it was meant to be worn – a regular outfit, not a souvenir. The closer I got to my friends and family, the more comfortable I was wearing their clothes (literally wearing their clothes, I’ve been known to borrow outfits on occasion!). Kurtis are normal clothing, and I still wear them this way. Not as a gimmick.
 
Sometimes when someone sees me wearing one for the first time they ask about it, usually by asking if I got it in India. I tell them yes, and about how great it was to live like a local there. In general, people are quite curious about the world. If you have the opportunity to share beautiful stories about the world, I say “take it”.
 
 
Another cultural fashion choice I adore is a headscarf. When I played dress-ups as a kid, I loved the look of a scarf flowing down over my ponytail, like a wedding veil in reverse, or over my head like Red Riding Hood. These days I love the elegance of hijabs, turbans and head wraps. But I don’t wear them. These items have deep cultural significance that I don’t feel I can honour and respect in a way that I feel they deserve. And I definitely do want to be respectful. I also would wish that headscarves of any kind were seen as a positive personal choice, which sadly is not always the case.
 
But scarves themselves are probably part of all varieties of cultural heritage, one way or another. It’s the most basic item of fabric you can have. So I wear mine in hybrid ways and happily tell people why – whether it be me once again tapping into my eastern side, or showing support for friends whose clothing choices are inspired by their faith, or sometimes, just sometimes, literally just wearing a scarf.
 
In any case, respect is always good look.
Hair choices… sombre or ombre?

Hair choices… sombre or ombre?

I’ve been thinking about doing something new with my hair. I’ve always had a history of playing withcolour, but for the last five years I’ve been rather tame. Partly because I was being “sensible” (i.e. “corporate”) and partly because I was growing it long and […]

Working it: Eye Shape

Working it: Eye Shape

Once again, The Pool has sent me off on a research mission. I follow The Pool on Facebook and find it’s a solid 3-way split: 1/3 disagree, 1/3 agree, 1/3 “Oh hell yeah, right on, sista!”. The post that sent me searching was this: How I […]

Phasing in some minimalism

Phasing in some minimalism

Indoor minimalist, outdoor stylish – can I look creative without owning much stuff?
 
We're looking for a new place to live. Super excited about the possibility of moving into a dream home: a shiny new apartment on the outskirts of the city. Close enough to walk to work, out enough to get a little quiet time.
 
Perfect!
 
It motivated Hubs and I to think about minimalism. We don’t need to as the apartment is going to be slightly bigger than where we are now, but moving home is a good opportunity to clear out the unnecessary and make some charity shop very happy.
 
I do often look at my wardrobe and wonder what I really need. I don’t want to the minimalist look (all monochrome and indistinct). I want to own little and be able to do a lot with what I have.
 
Before I start chucking stuff into a goodie bag for my local op shop, I have a question. Do you have separate work items and non-work items? Or is everything multi-purpose?
 
I have separate classifications in my wardrobe, even though smart-casual is the standard for my office. I still divide my clothes separately because I like the feeling of having a “uniform”. It gives me confidence to put on “work” clothes, “work” hairstyle, “work” makeup and, you know, get to work. But how many outfits do I really need?
 
I’ve decided to go for 3 trousers, 2 skirts, 5 tops and 5 dresses. Each item worn once would be two weeks of clothing. Then 5 bottoms plus 5 tops makes 25 combinations, plus 5 dresses and I’ve got 30 outfits! A different look every day for a month!
 

Next are the outer layers. Not a deal in summer, but for most of the year I’m going to want to have another layer either on me or easily accessible. I have blazers, cardis, wraps, jackets, coats and jumpers. Okay, now this is getting difficult.
 
Looking in my wardrobe, I realised that I forgot that I had a suit. I’ll have to keep that, it’s my power outfit. I’m not going to count it in the tally since it’s not going to be in regular use. I feel like I’m cheating already. Oh well. Back to the outer layers.
 
Since I can’t decide where to start, I’ll start culling from each section:
Cardis: I have seven. I love cardis, they’re so portable and easy and they come in every colour. But I guess I don’t need seven. I’ll only keep four.
Blazers: Ignoring the one with the suit, I have 2 and one I never wear. That was easy.
Wraps: Should I count these as outer layers, or accessories? I guess they are layers. I can’t part with any of them, I’ll have to keep all three.
Jumpers: I didn’t wear either of them last winter. Out they go!
Coats: Workwear-wise, I have two. A light one and a heavy one. So I’m keeping both of those.
 
Okay, that’s a start! What do you think? How many work items do you have?


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